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on the fiscal cliff in janaury. suzanne pratt, "n.b.r.," new york. >> susie: from grandma's cookies to holiday gifts for the little ones, still ahead we're riding along with u.p.s. as the shipping giant kicks off its busiest week of the year. >> tom: two mildly encouraging words were used by a group of economists to describe what next year may bring: stable and moderate. that's the 2013 outlook from the national association of business economics. the organization figures the u.s. economy will grow 2.1%, driven by housing and construction, but with corporate profit growth slowing down. nayantara hensel is the chairman of the national association for business economics. not bad, moderate, stable but certainly not robust here s it? >> no, that's absolutely right, tom. basically again we're forecasting annual average real gdp growth at 2.1% but the good news is we expect it to accelerate during the course of the year, perhaps reach being 3% by the fourth quarter of 2014. >> tom: what is going to add to that growth considering, is it being held back in the first six months because of the uncertaint
. >> susie: the threat of the fiscal cliff was a big topic at an investor conference in new york today hosted by johnson controls. this wisconsin-based industrial conglomerate is a leading provider of products to make buildings energy efficient, and it's also the world's largest maker of car batteries and automotive seats. c.e.o. stephen roell told me he's worried that uncertainty about the fiscal cliff could hurt consumer confidence, and his business. >> we don't do that. as the consumer, i products to costumers like the big three, that in turn sell to the autowa industry. my biggest concern is how it will affect the psychology of the consumer. i've been surprised, susie, that people continue to buy autobiles. thatouldar is change dramatically. >> sue:e steve, to what extent are the ups and downs impacting your business day to day. >> i think people are holding back on making captain investments. i see that particularly in the building side. from my standpoint, i continue to invest around the world. i'll invest make sure i'm buying the strategies we laid up for the next three years. the qu
pratt, nbr, new york. >> susie: when it comes to new claims for jobless benefits, the effects of super storm sandy appear to be passing. new claims fell by 25,000 in the week ending december 1 to a lower than expected 370,000 requests. that's raising hopes about november's jobs data, which is due out tomorrow. grey, and christmas says u.s. employment firm challenger, grey, and christmas says u.s. companies announced 57,000 job cuts last month. separately, the number of planned job cuts rose 20% in november from october's levels. on wall street, the dow rose 39 points, but the nasdaq added 15, the s&p up nearly five. >> reporter: i'm erika miller in new york. coming up tonight, we'll talk to the c.e.o. of kitchen store sur la table and get his outlook for holiday sales. >> tom: lots of theatrics today, but few visible signs of progress in washington towards a fix for the fiscal cliff. the only hopeful sign is that republicans and democrats are talking privately again. but they haven't worked out any of the big issues, including what to do about the nation's debt limit. washington will h
for workers looking to land a job in the coming weeks. suzanne pratt, "n.b.r.," new york. >> tom: citi and the financials lead the way higher on wall street, helping the dow top 13,000 again. but a big drop in apple shares kept the nasdaq from gains. by the closing bell, the dow was up 82 points, the nasdaq down 23, the s&p added two points. >> susie: investors were also encouraged by news that american workers were very productive this past summer, and that's good news for company profits. productivity increased at its fastest pace in two years, at an annual rate of 2.9% from july through september. that number blows away the initial estimate of 1.9%. erika miller takes a closer look at how technology is helping to boost safety and productivity. >> reporter: three years ago, this long island hospital had a problem: healthcare workers weren't cleaning their hands as often as required. >> 100,000 people die each year in the united states from hospital acquired infections. that's more than the number of people who die from breast cancer and from auto accidents. it's a huge problem, one t
, nbr, new york. >> tom: fast food diners dig in to mcdonald's cheddar bacon onion burger in november. still ahead, an update on much stronger sales at the golden arches. >> susie: christmas is still 15 days away, but fedex predicts today will be its busiest shipping day ever, over 19 million packages. that's more than double the company's typical daily volume, and a 10% jump from last year. today is also known as "green monday," and it kicks off one of the best weeks of the year for online retailers. erika miller reports. >> reporter: if you're wondering why today is called "green monday," its because of all the green changing hands. many of the sales are now online, so stores offer deep discounts to lure shoppers to their sites. the term "green monday" was created by ebay in 2007. it refers to the second monday in december, which is typically that site's biggest sales day of the year. overall, the season appears to be off to a strong start for merchants. >> i think they planned their inventory wisely. i think they planned their markdowns wisely. so, i think that smart retailers are
.5% by the end of next year. suzanne pratt, nbr, new york. >> tom: still ahead, could legalized recreational marijuana use become the new competitor for medical dope? we speak with the c.e.o. of marijuana products maker dixie elixirs. >> susie: american consumers did a bit of shopping in november after laying low the month before. retail sales rose three tenths of 1% last month, following a decline of the same amount in october. the pickup in november spending is a hopeful sign for an economy that many fear is slowing down. but retail experts say the trend can hardly be considered strong. >> it's muddling along. expectations were for 0.5% increase; it came in at 0.3% and that's off of a weak october. remember, october was quite weak. so, these are not robust numbers, they're not terrible numbers. it's a continuation of a sluggish consumer, that is still sluggish as the year wore on. >> susie: november sales were twice as strong if we don't include a big decline in spending at the pump. gas station sales posted their biggest drop in four years. instead of filling up, consumers bought cars, cl
do that now when the cost of money is still so cheap. suzanne pratt, "n.b.r.," new york. >> susie: american automakers got a bump up in sales in november, thanks to super storm sandy. consumers postponed purchases when the hurricane hit in october, and resumed buying last month. but as diane eastabrook reports, the looming fiscal cliff could cause that sales momentum to lose traction. >> reporter: november turned out to be a good month for the big three and a great month for their foreign competitors. g.m. and ford both saw a modest uptick in vehicle sales last month-- while chrysler got a double digit boost. but competitors from europe and japan blew the domestics doors off. sales at v.w. were up just under 30%. while honda led the japanese pack with a sales increase of just under 40%. the car companies think super storm sandy pushed some sales the last weekend of october into november. morningstar auto analyst richard hilgert agrees sandy helped, but the storm wasn't the primary reason november was such a strong month. >> we've got a lot of pent up demand still out there-- pent
be samsung. suzanne pratt, "n.b.r.," new york. >> susie: another nick to toyota's reputation. the automaker is paying a record fine, more than $17 million, for failing to promptly report safety defects related to a lexus recall. this is the second time since 2010 that toyota has paid fines for not properly reporting vehicle defects to u.s. regulators. toyota once had the best reputation for quality and safety, but in the last three years it has announced numerous recalls for separate investigations into sticky pedals, poorly designed floor mats and steering rod problems. >> susie: big changes coming to pfizer. the giant drug maker plans to cut about 20% of its u.s. sales force, or 600 jobs. according to a report from bloomberg, the cuts begin this month and are said to be part of c.e.o. ian read's strategy to reposition pfizer after losing patent protection on its top selling drug, lipitor. at its peak, that cholesterol drug generated revenues of nearly $10 billion a year for pfizer. while lipitor's loss was tough for pfizer, it was a boon for generic drug makers. but in the coming year, fa
. >> school of business at dartmouth with us tonight in new york. sydney, nice to see you and welcome. you have four of the worst c.e.o.'s of the year, beginning with number 4, mark pincus, manager of zynga that relies on facebook for its success. what brought mark to your list. >> facebook and zynga announced they would go their separate ways and no longer be tied in and you can guess who that will affect more, facebook or zynga. one executive manager after another has left and that is always something i have seen as one of the reason warnings signs of something going wrong. along the way acquisition was made for $180 millujjy didn't take them more than half a year to write down 50% of the value of that acquisition. so it really look like a company that is floundering and mark pincus along the way ended out cashing out as quickly as possible raising eye browse in the possible. >> to the makeup industry and fashion. andrea young, the former c.e.o. of avon, still the chairman. this company rejected a buy outr offer earlier in the year when the share price was closeƑi to 3 where it is now.
of this year's profits. suzanne pratt, "n.b.r.," new york. >> susie: 'tis the season for procrastination, but don't worry, there are still three full shopping days left until christmas. and what better time to get started than tomorrow. it's expected to be the busiest shopping day of the year and the best prices so far. during the last weekend before christmas, retailers are marking down merchandise by as much as 70% and they'll be pulling out all the stops to lure customers into stores and malls around the country. this final count-down is especially important to retailers: as much as 40% of holiday sales take place in the last ten days before santa makes his run. >> get out there right now. the sales are up! saturday, macy's is having their largest sales day of the year, as well as kohls. all those promotions are up right now. what we are seeing in the malls today and tomorrow all the way through christmas will be the most aggressive promotions of the year. >> susie: we didn't see much buying enthusiasm today. investors were discouraged on the stalemate in the fiscal cliff talks. the m
dividends in the coming weeks. suzanne pratt, "n.b.r.," new york. >> tom: cliff or no cliff. still ahead, tonight's market monitor guest says stock prices and the economy will grow in 2013. hank smith of haverford trust joins us. >> tom: super storm sandy keeps showing up in some economic data. this time: consumer spending. spending fell 0.2% in october. it was expected to be up that much. stocks were mixed with continued nervousness about the fiscal cliff. the dow gained just three points, the nasdaq lost nearly two. the s&p 500 was virtually unchanged. on the week, the dow up just barely. the nasdaq the biggest gainer: up almost 1.5%, the s&p up half a percentage point. >> susie: investors took a bite out of yum brands today. the stock tumbled 10% after the parent of k.f.c. and pizza hut said its business in china is slowing. yum's c.e.o. warned that china sales will fall by 4% in the fourth quarter, that's a big drop from the same period a year ago when sales surged 21%. blaming the weak chinese economy, yum also said it plans to reduce the number of restaurant openings in the asian n
.. >> on my way to work this morning, i saw the tree by the new york stock exchange, and it looks pretty impressive. >> tom: we saw you putting ornaments on it. but the trees are tweeting? is that right? >> susie: not quite right, and those trees are a little too high for me to reach to put an ornament. that's "nightly business report" for tuesday, december 4. have a great evening, everyone, and you, too, tom. >> tom: good night, susie. we'll see you online at, and back here tomorrow night. captioning sponsored by wpbt captioned by media access group at wgbh
Search Results 0 to 11 of about 12